Blogs

16
Jun

At Reset, we talk a lot about the transformative potential of Community Sponsorship. How it impacts the lives of refugees welcomed into communities in this country, but also how it transforms the lives of those doing the welcoming and brings change to communities. And we know there to be truth in what we say, because people tell us so. Anecdotally, we know that volunteers in Groups can find real purpose in supporting strangers. Through the stories they tell us, we know that Community... continue reading (4 min)

16
Jun

It’s been just over 4 years since the first refugee family arrived in the UK through the Community Sponsorship scheme. The successful development of a new programme always depends upon independent and thorough evaluation, which is why we are so excited by the University of Birmingham’s research into Community Sponsorship. In this blog, we share how we’ve adapted to address their recommendations, and what plans we have in place to continue to adapt. 1. Expanding the types of training... continue reading (4 min)

4
Jun

Jackie McLoughlin, founder of the Sutton Deanery Community Sponsorship Group, has been recognised by the Queen for her work to bring a Syrian refugee family to the UK and support their resettlement. Jackie was awarded Maundy Money in an 800-year-old tradition which sees people doing outstanding work in their communities recognised by the reigning monarch on Maundy Thursday. We spoke to Jackie to find out what Community Sponsorship means to her and why she believes that more people should be... continue reading (5 min)

29
May

After your Community Sponsorship Group welcomes a family to your neighbourhood, you can receive visits from the Home Office to see how your Group and the family you're supporting are settling in. This is part of the formal Sponsor Agreement that you make with the Home Office.  As of May 2020, the Reset team are taking over the running of these Post-Arrival Support Visits. By doing these visits ourselves, we’re hoping that we can better support Groups with... continue reading (3 min)

29
May

1. Choose your platforms As a general rule, we recommend using Facebook for raising awareness locally and Twitter for joining national (or international!) conversations. But, like all general rules, there are many exceptions so don’t be bound by this distinction. You know your local area best and if you know that there are lots of local conversations happening on Twitter, follow your instincts! If your volunteers already heavily use one platform, prioritise the use of that... continue reading (5 min)

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